Minnesota Info

Minnesota Divorce Start Your Divorce Find Professionals Minnesota Articles Divorce Facts Divorce Grounds Residency Divorce Laws Mediation/Counseling Divorce Process Legal Separation Annulments Property Division Alimony Child Custody Child Support Divorce Forms Process Service Grandparent Rights Forum Minnesota Products Divorce by County

Minnesota Articles

Agreements Attorney Relationship Custody & Visitation Child Support Divorce/General Domestic Abuse Financial Planning Mediation Parenting Property Division Spousal Support SEE ALL

Info Categories

Contemplating Divorce Children & Divorce Divorce, Dollars & Debt Divorce Laws Divorce Process Divorce Negotiation SEE ALL

More Information

Articles Checklists Research Center Cases of Interest Dictionary Encyclopedia Encyclopedia (pop-up) Blogs

For Professionals

Advertise With Us Free Network Page Join Our Network Submit Articles Case Management Sign In

Network Sites

Minnesota Divorce Support Minnesota Divorce Online

In A Minnesota Divorce or Custody Case, Should I Move Out of the House, And If So, How?

Clients often ask whether they should move out of the marital home prior to or during the commencement of divorce proceedings. The answer is very clear: "it depends". Generally speaking, if child custody, parenting time, or possession of the home might be an issue in the proceedings, I advise against it. Although no legal precedent is created by moving out, the lawyer for the remaining occupant routinely argues that:

  1. Custody should be awarded to my client because he or she is already living in the house which has been the childrenís home, so for the sake of continuity and stability for the children, letís leave well enough alone and not disrupt the situation with more moves.

  2. Possession of the home should be awarded to my client because he or she is already living there, and the other spouse has already moved out, so why force them to move all over again?"

Such arguments are made both in support of temporary as well as permanent relief. Such arguments do not always carry the day, but it is often a consideration that influences judges, even if they deny it. If custody is in issue or you really want to keep the house, try to stay put until the temporary relief hearing, which is your first opportunity to legally compel the other party to move out.

If you do need to move out of the home immediately because it is an abusive or otherwise insufferable situation for yourself or the children, the following precautions should be considered:

  1. If custody or parenting time is in issue, donít move out without first getting an enforceable written stipulation addressing custody and parenting time after the move-out. The key is to have in place at least an interim parenting time schedule which affords you at least as much parenting time as you hope to obtain through the court. Otherwise, the longer you acquiesce to a pattern of parenting time that is less than you desire, the more of an argument the other party will make of it against you. Often arguments like the following are heard:

    "Your Honor, the Petitioner moved out four months ago, and since then he has only had the children every other weekend, by his own acquiescence. Now all of a sudden he wants custody [or more parenting time, as the case may be]. This is clearly a disingenuous request which should be summarily denied. The schedule the parties have been following has worked well for the children, and for the sake of their sense of stability and continuity, it should continue."

    After the elapse of a period of time, nobody much cares if the reason you only had every other weekend was because the other parent truly wouldnít "let" you have more time. Although that may very well be the case, and although you may have let your spouse control the situation in order to spare the children the trauma of parental conflict, in my experience the courts are more swayed by the pattern of contact rather than by these "excuses." The wisdom of Solomon does not apply.

  2. Take with you all of the household goods and furnishings, and other items of personal property which you want to have, and inventory what you take. Although it is not a law, the old adage "possession is nine tenths of the law" is very applicable here. The reason boils down to the fact that litigating personal property issues is usually prohibitively expensive, because it normally costs more to litigate than the stuff is worth. So if you ever want to see it again, it is much simpler and easier to take it with you when you leave. [Caveat: donít get too greedy. If you empty the place out and leave the spouse and children to sleep and eat on a bare concrete floor, you will not look good].

* THE INFORMATION IN THIS ARTICLE IS NOT ADVICE FOR YOUR PARTICULAR CASE. ALSO, THIS INFORMATION APPLIES ONLY TO MINNESOTA LAW, AND NOT TO THE LAW OF ANY OTHER STATE OR COUNTRY.


Was this helpful? Like our site & let us know.

Related Articles


Start Minnesota Divorce Start Your Minnesota Online Divorce Today
Easy, Fast and Affordable with a 100% Guarantee.
Minnesota Divorce Find Minnesota Divorce Professionals in Your Area:
Join the Network
Minnesota Divorce Products, Services and Solutions Minnesota Divorce Products, Services and Solutions
Minnesota Divorce Resources to Help You Through the Process.
Online Parenting Class Minnesota Mandatory Online Parenting Class
Easy and convenient - complete at your own pace online.
Divorce and Custody Books Discount Divorce Bookstore
Over 100 Titles of the Best Books on Divorce & Custody.
Divorce Downloads Divorce Download Center
Instantly Download, Books, Manuals, & Forms.
Divorce Worksheet Free Minnesota Divorce Worksheet & Separation Agreement
Your Guide to Get Organized and Put Everything in Writing.
   
Minnesota courts look at many factors in deciding spousal support amounts. A spouse may be entitled to maintenance if he or she cannot support himself or herself despite any marital property received after distribution. Financial resources, employment, education and the personal circumstances of each spouse are considered. A court examines several factors to determine if maintenance is appropriate, and if so, how much and for how long. They include (1) the duration of the marriage, (2) the standard of living enjoyed during the marriage, (3) each spouse's age and health, (4) each spouse's assets, income or ability to earn income, (5) the time needed for the requesting spouse to receive training or education and obtain sufficient employment in order to support himself or herself and (6) the owing spouse's ability to pay. A court can order temporary support while the divorce is pending. Most maintenance is ordered for a specific length of time. Once maintenance is ordered, it can be modified upon a showing of a substantial change in circumstances.
Divorce Lawyers & Mediators
 

Find Professionals

Easily Connect With a Lawyer or Mediator
Have Divorce Professionals from Your Area Contact You!
Enter Your Zip Code:

 

Start Your Divorce File for a Minnesota Divorce

 

Settle Your Divorce Negotiate Your Minnesota Divorce

 

Support Forum Minnesota Support Forum

Children In Between - Online Parenting Class


FEATURED TOOL - How to Stop Your Divorce (Even When You Think its Too Late)

Guarantee Official PayPal Seal Facebook Twitter Versign Secure Site
Limited Offer Women's Rights Manual For Divorce
Cover Price: $55.95
Your Price: $29.95
You Save: $26.00

"The Absolute Best Investment in Your Divorce"

Men's Rights Manual For Divorce
Cover Price: $55.95
Your Price: $29.95
You Save: $26.00

"Uncover Your Options and Unleash Solutions"