Parent Responsibility Eval (PRE) harmful to child

Posted by: jenniemac

Parent Responsibility Eval (PRE) harmful to child - 07/19/17 02:05 PM

More and more parents are abandoning those working in the family court industry to help them determine parenting plans and divorce decisions and for good reasons.

It is costing the parents as well as the state more money to go this route. The study [url=[url=http://aja.ncsc.dni.us/publications/courtrv/cr52-4/CR52-4Turkat.pdf]http://aja.ncsc.dni.us/publications/courtrv/cr52-4/CR52-4Turkat.pdf[/url]]Harmful Effects of Child Custody Evaluations on Children[/url] (author Daniel Turkat) provides information on the harmful effects on children of having a custody evaluation or as it is called in Colorado a parenting responsibility evaluation (PRE).

The only role that has standardized training requirement and standards of practice is the Child and Family Investigator (CFI). It also has a cap on the dollar amt. the family court helper can charge. The PRE has neither.

Colorado changed the name from custody evaluation to PRE but did nothing to improve the process or provide required standardized training or rules regarding the report for those completing the evaluation. They have added even more family court helper (court appointees)roles in Colorado but did nothing to define the process or develop a standardized state training or an oversight process that is required for those serving in these legislated roles. It is a mess.

Fortunately more and more Colorado parents are figuring out these roles serve more as a tool for the family court industry to transfer parent financial funds to them. Interestingly enough it appears as if the industry is looking at creating some new processes and roles.

Please beware. This is what happens when divorcing parents realize it is just another tool the family court industry uses to deplete their family financial resources and many times their children end up being victimized in the process.

Even though a growing number states are requiring those on the bench to have training in problematic areas in parenting time/responsibility disputes Colorado judges and magistrates have no required standardized training. Many rely on the family court helper/appointee (who has no required specialized training in these area either) to provide them a report to help in their decision-making process.